Bramhall & Cheadle Hulme Bridge Centre
Release 2.19o
0 0 0 0 0 0
Pages viewed in 2021
Bulletin

Remember to Register for our online duplicate!

Videos on how to play online

Click Video for tips about playing online

Important Information
Important Information
July 2021 - Solutions
What Would You Bid
 
July Solutions
 

We have now completed our 10 Month “What Would You Bid” competition. I hope that you as competitors have enjoyed taking part, and as a reader have enjoyed the panelists’ reasoning, and that everyone might have picked up a trick or two!

 

I would like to give a huge thank you to all the panelists for taking time to answer and share their expertise with us.

 

Also, special thanks to Alec Smalley and Michael Byrne - without them this would have been a horribly bad effort - they have kept me on the straight and narrow - a feat not achieved by many!

 

Also, a special thanks to Barbara Lewis - without her sub editing, it would have been hard work for you to get anything sensible out of what I put to paper.

 

The biggest thanks go to you, the competitors. Most of you have not only sent in answers, but also your reasoning. In the course of the competition, more than 70 members of the club have sent in answers.

 

This month’s problems, at least for the panelists, offered up few options, and all but one of the problems had a great majority bid in the panel. The competitors had much more imagination and on problem 4 managed to come up with no fewer than 10 different bids.

 

This month’s competition was won by Victor Ridding with a perfect 40, with a 3-way tie for 2nd place between Dhun Daji, Peter Foster and Mary Green on 39.

 

The winner of our overall competition is Peter Foster with 252 points from his 7 best results, followed in second place by Victor Ridding on 250. In third place we have Dhun Daji (241) and in fourth Mary Green (238). A small comfort for Victor might be that over the 10 results he managed to gather 348 points against Peter Foster’s 338. Congratulations to all of them.

 

Amongst the Panelists in July, we had a four-way tie on 40 - Rodney Lighton, Alan Jones, Raymond Semp and Alec Smalley.

 

As usual, my comments will be in italics. Enjoy a good summer!

 


Problem 1
 
Dealer: East
Vul: All
Teams
 
South  
West   North    East 
 
  1 
?
     
 
South
♠ AKQ9653
 -
 QJ8732
♣ -
 

We included this problem for ‘the fun of it’. It is the kind of hand that has no ‘right’ answer and what surprised me is that not a single Panelist or competitor opted for the ‘all in’ 6 bid. You need partner to have only one of the  honours for it to make, and if it is off, it might still be a good save. And you get the opponents to guess at your level. Let’s see what the panelists said.

 

Alan Mould: Pass. The late great John Collings said that he was no longer prepared to discuss hands with 2 voids in them or hands with 9 card suits in them since anything could be right. I have great sympathy for that view. You are going to have to bid this hand on your own so it doesn't much matter what you do. 4♠, 1♠, 2, 6♠ could all work out fine. Since I don't have real teammates to answer to, I will try the old saw of passing - I may possibly bid later. Catches people occasionally… I told Alan: “Takes walking the dog’ to a new level for me, but Im sure you will get another chance to bid”. Alan replied: “I would be astonished if the hand got passed out. Mind you Neil Rosen did try passing Axx, AKxxxxxxx, -, x over a 1 opening on his right in a Camrose trial once and that did get passed out….”

 

Now to the bidders:

 

Espen Lindqvist: 4. Believe 4 should show at least twelve cards in spades and a minor, and game in hand. Anyway, it might be difficult to locate a diamond honour with partner.

 

Irving Blakey: Dbl. What else? I've got the Spades! Cannot disagree with the comment!

 

Joy Blakey: Dbl. It looks easy to get excited with this distribution but as you've got the spade suit you can start with dbl.

(1) - dbl - (4) - 5; Pass - ? Would that not be a bit of a pickle to be in?

 

The most popular way to show the two suiter amongst the Panelists was:

 

Royce Alexander: 2. Michael’s Cue bid showing 5+S, 5+m. Planning to jump in Diamonds on the next round.

 

Michael Byrne: 2. (Michaels Cue Bid). Hands with freak distribution immediately suggest a wild leap to a high level, and I am expecting to have to take several bids here, but the first priority must be to show a two suited hand and see if I can elicit support from partner. If I can, the sky's the limit. 

 

Rhona Goldenfield: 2. Spades and minor

 

Jeffrey Smith: 2. Best to show the two suited nature – Hopefully, you can cue bid later to find if Partner has a D honour which is possibly all you need for slam.

 

All sensible bids and comments in my book, even though I quite like my name brother’s distinction in distribution by the jump to 4. Now to the plurality who are deciding to take it slowly.

 

David Barton: 1♠. There is zero chance that this will be passed out and I feel I will be better placed if the auction comes back to me with opponents in a large number of Hearts or Clubs

 

Rodney Lighton: 1♠. Bid my longest suit first, intending to bid my second longest suit next (maybe).

 

Alan Jones: 1♠.

 

Raymond Semp: 1♠. Please don't tell me it goes P-P-P. I will not believe it! I will then bid 5.

 

Tom Slater: 1♠. 0%. Don't lose any sleep whatever you bid. So long as you don't pass throughout, I am sure you'll be fine.

 

Alec Smalley: 1♠. the bidding isn't going to end here - and I'll be better placed as to where to play with more info.

 

Alec’s final comment - I guess - is the reason that so many go for 1 rather than 2. As Tom Slater said: “Don’t lose any sleep whatever you bid”.  One competitor also suggested 3 (Modified Ghestem, showing S's and D’s) and 2 which we assume was meant as a strong jump shift.

 

Problem 1
Points
#Panelists
#Competitors
1♠ 
10
6
2
2 
9
4
16
4 
9
1
1
3 
9
0
1
2♠ 
7
0
1
Dbl
4
2
3
Pass
4
1
0

 

 


Problem 2

Dealer: East
Vul: None
Pairs
South West North East
      1 
?      
 
South
♠ A63
 AKQ8742
 K2
♣ 3
 

Do you bid or double? Some 20 years ago it might have been more of a question, but our Panelists are almost in unison. Let’s start with those who do not agree with the majority.

 

Irving Blakey: 1. This might end the auction, but I'm prepared to take a chance as I want to hear what pard has to say - Slam is a real possibility opposite a few of the right cards. Space conserving it is, and if it doesn’t go pass-pass-pass you have survived, and it might be the best bid - but worth the chance?

 

Now the one who knows where he wants to be.

 

David Barton: 4. I wish I was playing a sensible system where 2 was strong!!  I will X if opposition bid over this to show that I expected to make 4 and I have a few defensive values. A reasonable punt, and if partner is used to such strong jumps to 4, you’ll probably get to slam when it’s right.

 

Now to the overwhelming majority.

 

Royce Alexander: Dbl. Alternatives are 4 or (at pairs) 3NT. If partner responds 3♣, I’ll try 3.

 

Joy Blakey: Dbl. It's too powerful to bid 1 or 4 hearts so again I choose to say dbl first.

 

Michael Byrne: Dbl. This hand is too strong for 4 and holding some good defence to spades (and diamonds) I can afford to start with double. It's unlikely I am going any higher than 4, but if partner can respond strongly there is no reason why we shouldn't bid our slam. With my regular partner's I play a gadget here of 4 to show a good 4M overcall, but since that is not mainstream, I shall start slowly and build up. It's interesting to note that if partner was a passed hand, now I would overcall 4, then double back in. 

 

Rhona Goldenfield: Dbl. Too good to bid 4 

 

Espen Lindqvist: Dbl. Too good for a preempt or a one-level overcall. Planning to bid 4 next.

 

Alan Jones: Dbl. Whether this or 4 is better really depends on who my opposition is

 

Alan Mould: Dbl. Second choice 4. Doubtless David Barton will tell you this is a strong jump overcall…Finally, a precise prediction!

 

Raymond Semp: Dbl. I cannot afford to bid 1 this time.

 

Tom Slater: Dbl. 90%. Comfortably strong enough to double then bid hearts. Partner will not expect so much strength if we jump to game directly.

 

Alec Smalley: Dbl. Then followed by lowest  bid I can make

 

Jeffrey Smith: Dbl. Bit too strong for an immediate  overcall.

 

So, the overwhelming opinion is that this hand is too strong for both 1 and 4. If you do play with old fashioned (some might say stone aged) strong jump shifts, you could of course jump to 2.

 

Problem 2
Points
#Panelists
#Competitors
Dbl
10
12
17
4 
6
1
1
3NT
5
0
1
1 
4
1
4
2 
1
0
1

 

 


Problem 3

 

Dealer: East
Vul: All
Pairs
 
South West North East
      1♣ 
dbl pass 1  2 
?      
 
 
South
♠ AKQJ
 85
 AKQ6
♣ 852
 

You have a 19 count, but not what could be called a good fit for partner’s preferred suit, and a non-existing club guard. That said, partner must either have a long heart suit or some support for one of your suits, so should you keep going or leave it up to partner? Two competitors throw in the bowl, while that’s not for the red- blooded Panelists. All but one agree on the way forward. We give the microphone to the odd one out:

 

Alan Mould: 2♠. Second choice 4. Doubtless David Barton will tell you this is a strong jump overcall…The prediction is not 100%, but not off either.

 

Now to the rest of the panel.

 

Royce Alexander: Dbl. Showing a very strong hand, such as this balanced 19 count

 

David Barton: Dbl. An easy one - shows I have extra values but not Heart support - unanimous panel??? Thank goodness for the 2♣ bid or I really would have a problem.

 

Irving Blakey: Dbl. Least of the evils.

 

Joy Blakey: Dbl. Could possibly bid 3♣ looking for 3NT but partner might think I'm agreeing   so prefer to double again.

 

Michael Byrne: Dbl. Twice in a row! I am too strong to pass and lack a club stopper to bid NT. Broadly speaking my double shows extras and 3 cards in hearts (with 4 I raise directly, with two I bid my long suit), so I am only a little bit short. If partner rebids 2then I might try 2♠, explaining to partner afterwards that this is flexible. 

 

Rhona Goldenfield: Dbl.

 

Rodney Lighton: Dbl. Again, hoping for something intelligent from partner. Good thing he’s not playing with me!

 

Espen Lindqvist: Dbl. More take-out. Would have liked to hold three hearts but have to act.

 

Alan Jones: Dbl.

 

Raymond Semp: Dbl. And hope partner is stacked with clubs and hearts. I lead a club if he passes.

 

Tom Slater: Dbl. 100%. Entirely clear at this stage, nothing else is attractive. Hopefully, partner will be able in a position to pass.

 

Alec Smalley: Dbl. More t/o -I would prefer one more  for this but we cannot let 2♣ be the contract - unless Partner wants to penalise it, then I am happy

 

Jeffrey Smith: Dbl. It may be right to pass but this shows a very strong hand so partner can judge accordingly.

They all see some downsides to the double, but obviously regard the upside worth the bid. The Panel’s willingness to not have heel clicking attitudes is worthwhile to notice.

 

Problem 3
Points
#Panelists
#Competitors
Dbl
10
13
13
2S
4
1
2
2D
4
0
2
3C
1
0
5
Pass
1
0
2

 


Problem 4
Dealer: West
Vul: E/W
Teams
 
South    
West    North    East
  Pass 1♣  2♣(1) 
?  
(1) At least 5-5 in the majors, 10(ish)+ hcp
 
South
♠ 82
 A62
♦ AQ98
♣ Q532
 

You and partner have the balance of power, and highly likely a game on, so how to explore NT or minor game best? Let’s start with the doublers.

 

Joy Blakey: Dbl. Showing values.

 

Rhona Goldenfield: Dbl

 

Now to the players bidding the suits they don’t have:

 

Royce Alexander: 2♠. The system description section 4.2 says the higher cue bid of 2♠ is an artificial cue bid showing a sound raise of partner’s club suit. 2 would be showing Diamonds and a partial fit for Clubs. 2 would be natural NF. 3♣ would be about 7-9. I would like to be able to bid 2 showing a Heart stopper and values for 3♣ so that partner with extras can right side 3NT, but that is not the agreed system.

 

Espen Lindqvist: 2♠. Here I play cue-bid of opponent's highest ranking suit as a limit raise or better in clubs.

 

Alan Mould: 2♠. 2/♠. Given that the system says we are playing is Acol so 1♣ is natural then I bid whichever of 2 and 2♠ shows clubs in my methods. It is not a problem in Acol.

 

Tom Slater: 2♠. 100%. It's right to make a bid which says I have a raise in clubs and a good hand. I had no idea what that was in Standard English, but I am reliably informed by the link "A bid of the higher- ranking suit shows a sound raise to three of partner’s suit”.

 

Had the rules been that the bid that is best matched by a description in the system gets 10, 2 would be a possible winner. Can the majority convince us that the system is bad and their bid is the better?

 

David Barton: 2. Good raise to 3♣ with my Heart holding better than Spade holding

 

Irving Blakey: 2. Better choice than the ubiquitous double prescribed by the "system".

 

Michael Byrne: 2. Good raise in clubs. Holding a 12 count I want to force to game, and my main choices are to start with a double (showing 10+ balanced) or cue bid one of the opponents’ suits. Since double is normally reserved for hands that are interested in taking a penalty, I shall show a good club raise instead. Standard in this country is for the lower cue bid to show a good raise in partner's suit, and the higher cue bid to show a forcing hand with the 4th suit, in this case diamonds. (An immediate bid of 2 would show something like a weak two and be non- forcing). Having had another look at the vulnerability maybe I should double, but if we are playing 4 card majors and 1♣ is natural then I should probably raise!

 

Rodney Lighton: 2. In standard English this shows a limit raise plus in clubs.

 

Alan Jones: 2.

 

Raymond Semp: 2. When I eventually support clubs (at the 5 level if necessary), I hope partner reads it as the Ace.

 

Alec Smalley: 2. Good raise to 3 clubs+

 

Jeffrey Smith: 2. This unassuming cue bid shows at least a sound raise and looks the best way to progress the auction.

 

So, some disagreement about system, but much the same arguments for their choice of bids. Whatever the ‘book’ tells us - sort it out between you and your partner!

 

Problem 4
Points
#Panelists
#Competitors
2 
10
8
5
2♠ 
8
4
4
Dbl
7
2
4
5♣ 
3
0
1
3♣ 
1
0
5
Pass
1
0
1
3 
1
0
1
2 
1
0
1
3 
1
0
1
4 
1
0
1

 

 

 


Summary 

 

Experts

 

Name
Problem 1
Problem 2
Problem 3
Problem 4
Total
Rodney Lighton
1♠ 
Dbl
Dbl
2 
40
Alan Jones
1♠ 
Dbl
Dbl
2 
40
Raymond Semp
1♠ 
Dbl
Dbl
2 
40
Alec Smalley
1♠ 
Dbl
Dbl
2 
40
Michael Byrne
2 
Dbl
Dbl
2 
39
Jeffrey Smith
2 
Dbl
Dbl
2 
39
Tom Slater
1♠ 
Dbl
Dbl
2♠ 
38
Royce Alexander
2 
Dbl
Dbl
2♠ 
37
Espen Lindqvist
4 
Dbl
Dbl
2♠ 
37
David Barton
1♠ 
4 
Dbl
2 
36
Rhona Goldenfield
2 
Dbl
Dbl
Dbl
36
Joy Blakey
Dbl
Dbl
Dbl
Dbl
31
Irving Blakey
Dbl
1 
Dbl
2 
28
Alan Mould
Pass
Dbl
2♠ 
2♠ 
26

 

Leaderboard June 

 

Place
Competitors
Sum
1
Victor Ridding
40
2
Dhun Daji
39
Peter Foster
39
Mary Green
39
5
Adam Wiseberg
37
Rob Harris
37
John Parsons
37
8
Ian Pendlebury
31
Karen Reissmann
31
10
David Fussell
30
Mel Pelham
30
12
Steven Mattinson
27
Valerie Morgan
25
Richard Acaster
25
15
Barbara Lewis
24
Michael Greaney
24
Heather Saunders
24
Paul Beckwith
24
19
Eamonn Scott
21
20
Joyce Jones
20
21
Francis William Wetton
19
22
Andrea Knowles
17
David Cash
17
24
Liz Ineson
16

 

Leaderboard Overall (7 solutions)

 

Pos
Competitor
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Top 7
1
Peter Foster
38
40
37
34
33
30
31
29
27
39
252
2
Victor Ridding
37
32
35
36
34
33
33
33
35
40
250
3
Dhun Daji
30
28
34
28
37
34
32
35
16
39
241
4
Mary Green
31
31
31
19
27
36
37
33
31
39
238
5
Ian Pendlebury
40
27
31
32
23
30
36
30
30
31
230
6
Adam Wiseberg
32
28
36
30
35
17
30
26
24
37
228
7
Mel Pelham
0
32
28
38
40
25
33
18
22
30
226
8
Steven Mattinson
24
35
28
28
21
36
40
22
22
27
218
9
David Fussell
24
30
23
32
30
32
33
26
19
30
213
10
Michael Greaney
27
25
21
32
14
32
33
38
25
24
212
11
Joyce Jones
27
34
21
24
21
29
32
33
32
20
211
12
Rob Harris
29
27
30
24
29
25
32
26
14
37
210
13
Richard Acaster
29
31
18
24
29
27
33
32
21
25
206
14
Barbara Lewis
24
30
36
20
23
30
33
27
23
24
204
12
Valerie Morgan
23
16
27
38
20
21
26
27
28
25
194
15
Andrea Knowles
34
24
25
19
26
21
34
29
15
17
193
Paul Beckwith
0
30
32
29
27
27
22
24
19
24
193
17
Heather Saunders
26
27
27
32
0
27
24
27
26
24
192
18
Geoff Ashcroft
28
24
23
22
18
36
30
25
15
0
188
19
Eamonn Scott
20
35
31
22
18
21
29
28
15
21
187
20
Liz Ineson
26
36
28
25
12
15
20
34
13
16
185
21
Francis William Wetton
10
31
25
0
21
0
34
29
0
19
169
22
Millie Lang
22
25
18
28
17
23
27
0
0
0
160
23
Gerard Keary
0
34
0
22
0
28
34
27
11
0
156
24
David Cash
0
25
21
16
16
0
0
32
25
17
152