Spade Heart  Diamond Club
Recent Updates
Home Page
5th Aug 2019 11:46 BST
Masterpoints Cup Winners
14th May 2019 18:19 BST
Club Shield Winners
14th May 2019 18:02 BST
0 0 0 0 0 0
Pages viewed in 2019
News Page
This page has information and news of interest to the members. For a full list of forthcoming events, see "Calendar" on the menu and for a list of results see "Results".
Don't panic !

I have unearthed this hand from an old scorecard (It was Board 1 on June 7th). South was declarer in 6H:

 

          K 9 5

          A K 10 4

          K 10 9 7 4

          5

 

          A J 7 3

          Q 9 8 7

          A J 3

          A J

 

The opening lead was S4 to the 5, 10 and J. A heart to the A saw West discard S2. Well, if East has the long hearts, then West presumably has the long diamonds. So DA, and run the DJ. East could see what was coming, and declined to ruff, but diamonds were continued, and East has no defence.

 

The full hand:

 

               K 9 5

               A K 10 4

               K 10 9 7 4

               5

 

Q 8 6 4 2          10

                          J 6 5 3 2

Q 6 5 2              8

K 9 6 3              Q 10 8 7 4 2

 

               A J 7 3

               Q 9 8 7

               A J 3

               A J

Last updated : 18th Jul 2012 15:31 BST
Defend 6NT

This was Board 19 on the night of the AGM. Dealer South, E/W vul.

The bidding is not very informative:

S          W           N       E

Pass   1C(1)     pass    2NT(2)

Pass   3NT      pass     4NT(3)

Pass    6NT    all pass

1)      16+ points

2)      11-13 or 16+ points, balanced

3)      16+ points

You lead the C4, and see the following situation:

          A 6 5

          K Q

          9 5 4

          A K 9 8 6

Q 7 4

A 10 5 3

10

10 7 5 4 2

Dummy plays low, partner follows with the C3, and declarer wins with the CJ, continuing with the CQ, on which partner discards the D2.

Declarer continues with the H2; you win the HA, partner playing the H9, and continue with a second heart, partner playing the H6. The situation is now:

          A 6 5

          -

          9 5 4

          A K 9

Q 7 4

10 5

10

10 7 5

Declarer now cashed four top diamonds, partner following all the way what do you discard ?

(Actually, at the table, your hand continued with S4, not a heart, and declarer won in dummy. Does that make a difference ?

See below

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

At the table, South discarded two hearts, and that was fatal. The full hand was:

          A 6 5

          K Q

          9 5 4

          A K 9 8 6

Q 7 4                 J 10 2

A 10 5 3            J 9 8 6

10                      8 7 4 3 2

10 7 5 4 2          3

          K 9 8 3

          7 4 2

          A K Q J

          Q J

After the diamonds had been cashed, the situation was:

          A 6

          -

         

          A K 9

Q 7                    J 10 2

-                         J 8

-                      -

10 7 5            -

          K 9 8 3

          7

          -

          -

The two top clubs were cashed, and partner was squeezed in the majors. If you keep a third heart (or lead a spade initially), the hand cannot be made.

Last updated : 18th Jul 2012 15:20 BST
How do you play 5H ?

This was Board 6 last night (March 29th).

 

Dealer E; Vul E/W

 

          K 4

         10 9 4 3 2

          K 4 2

          A J 5

 

          6 2

          A K J 8 7 6 5

          A

          6 3 2

 

   E          S           W         N

   1D       4H       pass      pass

   4S       pass      pass      4NT

  pass      5H      all pass

 

Perhaps you should have passed 4NT, which is cold, but how do you play 5H on the lead of the D5 ?

 

Well, you get off to a faultless start by winning the DA, and drawing trump (West follows, East plays D3.

 

On reflection, East may well have 11 or more cards in diamonds, and spades, given his aggressive bidding at unfavourable vulnerability. If his holding in clubs is Kx, Qx, KQ, K or Q, then the hand is now cold: club to the A, discard a spade on DK, trump a diamond, and lead a club. East wins, but can only lead a spade or a diamond. Curtains. Note that it would not have helped East to unblock a high club. Only an initial spade lead defeats 5H.

Note also that, even if West holds CKQ, they must refrain from splitting honours whan the first round of clubs is led towards dummy.

 

The full hand:

 

          K 4

         10 9 4 3 2

          K 4 2

          A J 5

 

J 9 5 3            A Q 10 8 7

Q                    -

10 8 5             Q J 9 7 6 3

Q 10 9 8 4      K 7

 

          6 2

          A K J 8 7 6 5

          A

          6 3 2

Last updated : 30th Mar 2012 09:24 BST
Second hand high!

Sometimes a hand comes along straight from the text book Board 20 on March 15th was such a hand. I have rotated the board to make South declarer – in fact East was declarer:

Dealer N, both vulnerable:

               10 6 2

               Q J 8 2

               K 7 2

               9 7 5

Q J 9 8                K 7 4 3

10 7                     5 4

A J 6 4 3              9 8

K 10                     Q J 4 3 2

               A 5

               A K 9 6 3

               Q 10 5

               A 8 6

N           E            S            W

Pass      pass       1H           2D

2H        pass        3C(1)     pass

3H(2)   all pass

1)      Trial bid – can you help me in clubs

2)      No!

The opening lead was a spade to the king and ace. Declarer drew trumps, and led a spade towards dummy, West won and played a third spade. Declarer ruffed and led a low club away from the ace. West won the 10, and played CK to declarer’s A. Declarer exited on a third club to reach this position:

               -

               Q 2

               K 7 2

               -

9                          7

-                           -

A J 6 4                 9 8

-                           Q 4

               -

               A 9

               Q 10 5

               -

East, on lead for the first time, led D9, but declarer played DQ, and the defence could only come to one more trick.

Last updated : 16th Mar 2012 09:58 GMT
Cui Culpa ?

This was Board 1 on March 1st 2012:

 

Dealer: N

Vul: none

 

               Q 10 9 8 7 2

               7 3

               K 10 9 5

               8

3                             7 5

8                             K J 6 5 4 2

A Q J 7 6 4             3

A K Q 7 6               J 5 3 2

               A K 6 4

               A Q 10 9

               8 2

               10 9 4

 

N        E          S        W

Pass   pass     1NT     2NT

3S      pass       4S      5D

dble   pass      pass    pass

 

North led C8, the CJ winning in dummy.

Declarer finessed DQ, losing to North’s King

North returned a spade to South’s K

Club ruff

Spade (a heart results in a 3-trick defeat)

 

Should North have switched to a heart, or should South have played the SA on the first round to virtually force North into a heart switch ?

Last updated : 9th Mar 2012 13:57 GMT
How do you play 7NT ?

This hand arose last Thursday (February 16th). How do you play 7NT on the lead of C10. No opposition bidding:

 

A K J 5

A 5

4 3

A K 5 3

 

9 2

K Q J

A K J 10 9 3

Q J

 

You can cash CQJ, cross to HQ, discard two diamonds on CAK, cash two more hearts, (discarding a spade) and play a spade to the K to reach this position:

 

A J 5

-

4 3

-

 

9

-

A K J 10

-

 

At this point, there are three possible lines:

A) Finesse a diamond, cross to SA, and repeat the diamond finesse (50%)

B) Play the diamonds from the top, and if the DQ doesn't drop, finesse the SQ (50%)

C) Play a diamond to the ace, cross to SA, and repeat the diamond finesse (50.4%)

Strange that the chances of winning should be so close for the three lines.

Last updated : 17th Feb 2012

 

 

Last updated : 17th Feb 2012 12:24 GMT
How do you play 3NT ?

Board 23

Dealer S, Both Vul

 

How do you play 3NT on these hands:

 

9 5              A 7 4

Q 9 4 3       10 8

A K Q         9 8 7

Q 8 6 5        A K 4 3 2

 

Assume spades are led and continued.

 

As it happens, the cards lay extremely favourably, and 3NT made easily.

Last updated : 16th Jan 2012 12:38 GMT
A Trump Coup

Board 6; Vul:E/W. Dealer E

 

E       S        W      N

p       1H      p       1S

p        2H     p        4H

p        p        p

 

          K Q 10 8

          K 10 5

          A 6 5 2

          6 5

A 9 4 3          J 2

9                   Q 8 6 2

10 7 4 3         K 9 8

K Q J 2          10 8 4 3

          7 6 5

          A J 7 4 3

          Q J

          A 9 7

Declarer ducks the CK lead, won the club continuation and ruffed a club in dummy. This was followed by cashing the HK and running the H10, West showing out.

The SK was played from dummy, West continuing with a 4th club, which declarer ruffed. Declarer then lost the diamond finesse, East winning, and returning a second diamond (A spade is better).

Declarer won the diamond in hand, played a spade to dummy, discarded a losing spade on the DA, and was in dummy at trick 12 with HAJ sitting conveniently over East’s HQ8

Well played Tony

Last updated : 16th Jan 2012 12:36 GMT
Plan B

Sometimes on a hand you have to change your plan in the middle of the hand if something unexpected happens. A good example of this was the following hand (Hand 18, December 1st)

 

Vul: N/S     Dlr: East

 

E       S        W      N

1H    pass    1S    pass

2C    pass     2H  all pass

 

South found the excellent lead of the H3, and dummy came down (Rotated for clarity):

 

K 9 8 3

Q 7 5

K 7 6 2

4 2

 

A 4

K 10 8 6 4

A 10

K 10 8 7

 

The H5 was played from dummy, and North played the H2, and South the H4 for a very cheap trick.

This was followed by a club to the C5, C7, CA. A heart was continued to North’s A, and North switched to the CJ. Declarer won, and led a third club. South thought for a few seconds, and discarded a small spade, declarer ruffing in dummy. Declarer now thought that the hand must have been (with South still to play):

 

          K 9 8 3

          Q

          K 7 6 2

          -

? x x x            ? x x

J                     -

? x x x            ? x x

-                     Q 9

          A 4

          K 10 8

          A 10

         10

 

So SK, HK(diamond discard), SA, Spade ruff. Disappointment. North discards on the third spade. Wait a minute, the cards must now lie as follows, and plan B kicks in:

 

 

          9

          -

          K 7 6

          -

Q                    -

-                     -

? x x               ? x x

-                     Q

          -

          10

          A 10

         10

 

Just lead the last trump, and the remaining tricks are scored by a double squeeze!

Last updated : 9th Dec 2011 12:09 GMT
Grand Slam !
Grand Slam !

Grand slams don’t come up very often, but one came up last Thursday (November 24th). It was Board 1, and Elsie  Summerfield was sitting East, David Tarsky West.

Dealer North, nobody vulnerable:

 

 

 

 

K Q 8 7 3 2                 A 10 9

K 3                              A J 10 8 6

A Q J 8                        K 6 5 4

5                                  A

 

The bidding was:

 

S              W           N            E              

                             pass         1H           

pass         1S         pass         2D

pass         4NT      pass         5S

pass         5NT      pass         6D

pass         7NT      all pass

 

7NT is 100% on any lead, as David Tarsky demonstrated by playing SK at trick 2, thus enabling him to handle a 4-0 spade break either way.

 

Well bid and well played!

Last updated : 25th Nov 2011 10:26 GMT
Can South Make 4H ?

This hand came up last night (November 10th):

Board 17, dealer N, vul none:

               K 7 6 5

               5 3 2

               K J 9 6

               J 3

A 9 4 3 2          J 10 8

4                       K J 10 8

5 4                    Q 10 7

Q 9 8 6 2          10 7 4

               Q

               A Q 9 7 6

               A 8 3 2

               A K 5

And the question arose as to whether South can make 4H against best defence.

The answer is yes.

Suppose west leads D5 (as good as anything). Declarer wins in hand, and leads SQ, West winning, and playing a second diamond. Declarer wins in dummy, discards a diamond on the SK and plays a heart (2,10,Q,4). CAK and a club ruff follow to reach the following position;

              7 5

              5

              J 9

              -

9 4 3               J

-                     K J 8

-                     Q

Q 9                -

              -

              A 9 7 6

              8

              -

Declarer now ruffs a spade, and exits on a diamond, East wins; if East plays H8, South plays H9, a higher heart, and South ducks.

The hand can also be made if South ruffs a spade at trick 5.

Last updated : 11th Nov 2011 10:40 GMT
An unusual squeeze

This hand came up last night (November 3rd), rotated 180 degrees for convenience.

Board 1, love all, match-points, dealer South:

               A 5 4 3

               6 2

               A K J

               7 5 3 2

J 10 8 7 2        K 6

9 4 3                K J 8

10 7 5 3           9 4 2

6                      A J 10 9 8

              Q 9

              A Q 10 7 5

              Q 8 6

              K Q 4

S               W              N              E

1H            pass          1S              2C

2NT         pass           3NT

Opening lead C6.

East won the opening lead, and continued clubs, West discarding a low heart.

Declarer used the diamonds as entries to dummy to take repeated heart finesses, and ran the hearts to reach the following end position:

               A 5

                -

                -

                7 5

J 10 8                 K 6

-                          -

10                       -

-                         10 9

                 Q 9

                 -

                 Q

                 Q

Declarer now cashed the DQ, discarding a spade from Dummy. East is caught in a criss-cross squeeze: if East discards a spade, declarer crosses to dummy’s SA, and back to the CQ to cash SQ; alternatively, if East discards a club, declarer cashes CQ, and crosses to dummy’s SA for the winning club.

Often, such an end-position is ambiguous, Declarer not knowing whether to criss or to cross so to speak, but in this case Declarer knows the club position, and there is not problem.

Last updated : 11th Nov 2011 10:40 GMT