Release 2.19p
Recent Updates
Home Page
12th Jun 2024 12:56 BST
BULLETIN
29th Apr 2024 15:18 BST
Club Competitions
12th Feb 2024 15:55 GMT
0 0 0 0 0 0
Pages viewed in 2024
BULLETIN

 2024 April Averages 

Wendy Gee Cup.....Gerard & Keith

 Founders Cup...Diane & Ann

Aylsham Cup.... Jill & Marion (Tony & Pete)

NO FEAR BRIDGE
NO FEAR BRIDGE

Everyone Welcome.

2018 CHRISTMAS LUNCH
2018 CHRISTMAS LUNCH

It was to good to see Diana at the Hol;iday Inn. How thoughtful of Mary to bring her along to our 'Away Days.'

2016 GLOBETROTTING
2016 GLOBETROTTING

Do you know where Val and Keith are? I wonder if they played Bridge or just held good hands!

THE DUTIES OF A DEDICATED DUMMY.

Doing Dummy Proud

The Duties of a Dedicated Dummy by NIgel Block.

"Most players believe that being Dummy is rather boring and try to avoid the role as the main duty is to place played cards in the direction of NS or EW depending on who won the trick. However the number of rights and constraints thrust upon you may surprise you. Here are just some of them.

As Dummy you can:

1. Warn any of the players that a quitted card is in the wrong direction, but only if you spot the lapse before the next trick is started.

2. Attempt to prevent Declarer leading from the wrong hand by saying something like, ‘I think you are in Dummy’. However you must not point out the error once a card has been played.

3. Try to prevent a Defender from leading out of turn. Even so you must remain silent once the card has been played.

4. Attempt to warn Declarer of a possible revoke by for example asking, ‘No more spades, partner?’

But what about the limitations placed on Dummy?  Once again here are just a few of them.  During the play of the hand, as Dummy you are not allowed to:

5. Comment on any irregularity committed by any player.

6. Study an opponent’s system card.

7. Say how many tricks have been won or lost.

8. Call the TD on your own initiative.

9. Hover over a card or suit in dummy in anticipation of declarer’s next play.

At the end of the play of the hand as Dummy you may:

10. Draw attention to a perceived irregularity.

Condition 6 is often broken at club level. The danger here is that you may unintentionally be giving unauthorised information (UI) to your partner.

Condition 9 is quite important.  At one time or another, I suspect most of us have committed this offence in an attempt to save time. However it is prohibited under the laws. The TD can award an adjusted score if he/she believes that Dummy was indicating a possible line of play to Declarer.

Technically a procedural penalty against your side is a possibility for disregarding any of the rules, but in club competition the TD would probably just point out your error and take no further action. 

Note: The list above is not exhaustive; full details can be found in Sections 42-43 of the 2017 laws."

Hand of the week
Hand 11 from Thursday 2nd June 2016

East/West bravely bid to 6 Hearts! South leads AC followed by QC. Sitting East how would you play the hand to make twelve tricks? Answers please to Ann (davidmelville@holmanroad.freeserve.co.uk) by 30th June. A prize for the first "best" solution assuming "Best Defence".

Answer in a while!

SQUEEZED IN THREE SUITS!
 
 
 K 10 6 2
 2
 5 3
 K J 10 9 4 2
 
 
 
 
 
W
E
S
T
NORTH E
A
S
T
16
SOUTH
 
 
 
 
 
 A
 A Q 10 6
 K Q 8 2
 A 7 6 3
 
 
 


After 3 passes, South is left with several options to open a 19 point, 4441 hand.  Traditionalists may prefer to open the suit below the singleton...........1H, but with the likely continuation of 1S, and a number of NT's, the club fit may fail to come to light.  Some may have the option of opening 2NT with this 19 count by "borrowing" a card from another suit and pretending it is a spade.  Going against the traditionalists, I prefer to open most strong hands (16+), and especially strong 4441's, with the lowest of 4 card suits.  It has the dual advantages of maximizing the possibilities of finding the correct trump fit, whilst also finding out what your likely lead from West is going to be in a NT contract.  So, the auction at our table went, 1C followed by a 1S overcall from West.  North is now faced with a small bidding decision - the safe 1NT, showing 6-9 and a Spade stop, or a more adventurous bid in Clubs.  For those North's playing pre-emptive raises above an overcall, 2S would show a good raise to at least 3C, and would gain my vote with this 8 loser North hand.  Another alternative is simply to jump to 3 or 4 Clubs.  It gets the distributional message over, and now South can bid Blackwood, or simply jump to 6C.  So, at our table, the auction after the 1S overcall went simply 4C, followed by 6C.

You are now declaring 6C as South, and receive a small spade lead.  Plan the play.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 A 6 3
 K 8
W
E
S
T
NORTH E
A
S
T
20
SOUTH
 10
 9 6
 Q 7
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 6
 J 9 8 5 4
 
 
 
 
 A 6 3
 K 10 7
W
E
S
T
NORTH E
A
S
T
8
SOUTH
 
 A K Q
 K 7 2
 
 
 4
 9
 Q 10
 A J
 
 
 
At trick 8, dummy is on lead, with declarer (West) needing 5 of the remaining 6 tricks to bring home the 3C contract.  Declarer knows that South has both the outstanding A and J of trumps. Plan the play assuming that south refuses to ruff in.
 
 10
 
 A K 5
 A 8 3
 
 
 7 5
 9 8
 J 5 2
W
E
S
T
NORTH E
A
S
T
11
SOUTH
 
 
 J 10 6
 K 10 9 4
 
 Q 8 7
 
 7
 Q 7 6
 
 
 

How do you avoid losing a trick to the king of clubs?

 
Should we have bid the slam?

This is Board 2 from Monday's Championship Pairs on February 16th . Most Wests were in 3NT making 11, 12 or 13 tricks. A diamond lead from North makes life easier but on our table the 2S was lead by North. How would you play the hand to make 12 tricks?

 

Sitting West ths is how I played the hand.and my thoughts as I played

TRICK 1    West won 2S lead by North  with AS       (leaving my KS as entry to table to possible heart tricks).

TRICK 2    AH won by West    (mmm I only have six top tricks so need at least three more. Hearts & Clubs look like a possible source.)

TRICK 3    KH won by West     (To try to unblock the suit and phew the QH dropped from North promoting three heart winners on the table)

TRICK 4    Now I had to stop and think... I cannot afford to cross to KS to make my three hearts before losing my AC otherwise North will make QS and another spade ............ so at trick 4 I must lose the AC and  establish at least one Club trick........I would have prefered to lead clubs from dummy but i only have KS entry so I must lead from my hand........KC led by West losing to North's AC and establishing QC as my 10th trick.

TRICK 5    Another  Spade  from North won by East with KS (It does not matter which suit North leads at this stage as I still have masters in every suit)

TRICK 6   Jack Hearts from East discarding  7S from West

TRICK 7   10 Hearts from East discarding 4 Spades from West

TRICK 8    2 Hearts  from East discarding JD from West

TRICK 9    Now I continued with Clubs,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Small club from West to Queen - happy that I will now confidently make 3NT plus One...............and amazingly the JC falls on my Queen making the 10 C and 9C  masters in dummy.

TRICK 10   Ace Diamonds from West.

TRICK 11   King Diamonds from West.

TRICK 12    8C to 10 Clubs in East

TRiICK 13    9 Clubs master in East making 12 tricks!

West made 3NT plus 3   (12 TRICKS)

Lots of discussion about if we should have been in a slam.....................No not at all,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,just very lucky that North had two doubletons with the missing honours......................... but we all need a bit of luck sometimes..................Remember to play the cards in the right order.............lose your losers when you want to, when you still have control of the other suits..................in your mind put the missing cards where you want them to be............Sometimes they are there!