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SSCBA Sim Pairs - 15th August 

Partners for afternoon sessions

Should you require a partener for either Monday or Wednesday afternoon please seek Sam`s assistance by phone, 07931702776, text or email.

How can you help?

It would be much appreciated if everyone could help in small ways at the start (getting scorecards etc out) and end of sessions (loading the dishwasher), don't leave the director to do everything!

If you would like to try your hand at scoring or directing please contact Terry Maltby or Michael Metcalf, more volunteers for these duties are always needed.

Please Arrive 15 minutes before play

At all club sessions please arrive at least 15 minutes before play is due to start, 6:45 for 7 p.m. start, 7 for 7:15 start, 1:15 for 1:30 start. If you are running late please ring the club, 01785 246611, to let the scorer know you are on your way so that they can factor you in when setting up the movement and scoring systems.

Tuesday Standbys

A host system runs on Tuesday evenings whereby if you arrive at the club without a partner not later than 7 p.m. then the "stand by" for that evening will be called in to play with you. 

EBU

2018 EBU Master Point Promotions

Master (5,000 MPs)

  • I Andrew
  • E Clarke
  • P Martin

County Master (2,500 MPs)

  • S Holden
  • G Sproston
  • A Whiteman

District Master (1,000 MPs)

  • J Brassington
  • S Clarke
  • W Pitt
  • G Skene

Club Master (200 MPs)

  • C Kane
  • F Townsend
  • S Townsend
  • A Wilson

For 2017 and earlier entries see website.  See also the leader board.

Polite Notice.

A number of members sadly have health issues effecting  their immune systems.  Members are politely asked to refrain from playing at the club when suffering from infections. Super clean hands too at all times please to prevent any infection passing via the cards.

Rules 7, 9 AND 11
Rules 7, 9 and 11

The Rule of Seven ~

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How many times should you hold up your Ace?  This rule gives you a logical answer!~

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If you, as declarer subtract from 7 (seven) the total number of cards in the suit in your hand and dummies, the result is the number of times declarer should hold up with his Ace.  For example you have Aj8 and the dummy has 63. Together you have 5 cards in the suit, subtract 5 from the number 7, and 2 (twice) is the number of times you hold up the Ace.~

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This rule, of course, assumes you are playing in 3 NT. It can be generalized for all no trump contracts as follows:~

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Add four to the rank of the contract and subtract the number of cards you hold in the suit.

~


The Rule of Nine ~

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The Rule of Nine can assist the partner, who has been forced to respond after a double, in arriving at the best action. The concept is explained below: ~

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When your partner decides to reopen the auction with a double, then you should take some action. The Rule of Nine assists you in deciding to take the correct action.  After a reopening double, you should either: ~

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    ~
  1. Bid your BEST suit. ~
  2. ~
  3. Raise the suit of your partner with a minimum of two or more, but no less. ~
  4. ~
  5. Pass for penalty when holding length and defensive values in the opponents’ suit. ~
~

To help you decide which action is best, the Rule of Nine should be actioned as follows: ~

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1. You add: ~

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·         The level of the contract ~

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·         The number of cards held in the suit of the opponent ~

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·         The number of honours held in the suit of the opponent (include the 10) ~

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2. If the calculated number is nine or more, then you pass for penalty. ~

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3. If the calculated number is eight or less, then you should bid. ~

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~

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For example, if you as South, in the following auction, ~

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~

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N. 1 S     E.  2H     S.  P.     W.  P. ~

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~

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hold Hearts AQ987, which is the suit of the opponent, then the calculation is: ~

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Level = 2
Number of cards held in the suit of the opponent = 5
Number of honours held in the suit of the opponent = 2
Total = 9 ~

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Rule of Nine: South should Pass.
~

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~

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Another example, if you, in the above example, held Hearts AQ97, which is the suit of the opponent, then the calculation is: ~

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Level = 2
Number of cards held in the suit of the opponent = 4
Number of honours held in the suit of the opponent = 2
Total = 8

~~~

~

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Rule of Nine: South should take some competitive action.

~

The Rule of Eleven
When you are absolutely sure that the lead card is the 4th highest of the suit, you subtract the number of the card lead, from the number 11, the result is the number of HIGHER cards contained in the hands of the partner of the leader and the declarer and the dummy.~

~~~

This information is useful not only to the declarer, but also to the partner of the leader, who can apply the same mathematical calculation. This information can be useful in deciding to play which card, either from the hand of the partner of the leader, or the hand of the declarer or from dummy.  For example, card lead 7 Diamonds, subtract from 11 = 4 cards higher in the other 3 hands.  You know how many is in Dummy and your own and can then deduce how many in the other hand.  Against no trump contracts, because the lead is usually 4th highest, this rule is one of the most useful.~

~~~
~~~