Brevion Bridge Club
Brevion Bridge Club
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Board 3
Holidays

Holidays

Rather than just not playing if your partner is on holiday, use it as a good opportunity to gain experience by playing with someone new! It is amazing how often new partnerships do well – probably because both of you keep things simple and concentrate harder! You may get some new ideas to try when your partner returns.

Contact Marlene or let us know at the beginning of the preceding club evening.

Claiming

 

Claiming

A player is entitled to claim the remainder of the tricks at any time (whether declarer or defender).

HOWEVER, because at that point the play stops, the person claiming MUST state how they intend to play the remaining tricks eg. drawing trumps. If they fail to do this and there is any chance that the opposition could win a trick, then the director must be called. The director is then is required to play the hand giving the opposition the benefit of the doubt in how it is played even if that play is unlikely. Therefore, unless there is absolute certainty in the play or unless you specify exactly how you are going to play the remaining tricks, it may be safe to play the hand out. 

Sit Out Boards
Sit Out Boards

Several people have been worried lately that when they sit out for a board they are penalised – the thinking being that they score zero for the boards that they miss which places them at a disadvantage.

Panic not! Our clever scoring system has a solution!

The following is Ron's reply to one such query regarding results on 19th April:

Look at the merged results – example, you will see that Chris P/Ann S scored 551.5 Match Points from a possible 836 maximum (i.e they played two boards less than others) whereas Colin P/Richard E scored 586.1 from a possible 912 maximum (i.e they played two boards more. And the same can be seen looking down the ranking.

 

Thus your average is of the points available to you as a pair, on the boards you played. Absolutely fair!

Merged Scores
 

 

Merged Scores

So many people ask about why their position changes when results are merged that I think it is worth trying to explain again.

 Imagine that in your green section, on one board, you come 5th out of 10 ie. about 50%.

Now imagine that the 10 pairs in the red section all do worse than you. You are now 5th out of 20 ie. 75% when the results are merged.

Conversely, all 10 reds may do better than you and you are now 15th out of 20.

On each board your score may vary considerably when the sections are merged and so the final positions may change from those in the single sections.