BERRY BRIDGE CLUB
BERRY BRIDGE CLUB
 
Bulletin

Congratulations to Christine Houghton awarded Grand Master level. 

 
AU REVOIR
AU REVOIR

Members of Berry Bridge Club recently bid farewell to Audrey Griffin a past President and long time member of the club.

Audrey first joined the club in its infancy and was afounding member. She first joined the club in May, 2000 and was elected to the committee in November 2001 where she successfully served for five years. In 2002 Audrey was elected President and held this position for the next four years.

Audrey and her committee spearheaded the move to the club becoming incorporated  and this was achieved in January, 2003.

During her Committee years many progressive changes were introduced including, the first steps to scoring computerisation, interclub tournaments with both Bowral, Southern Highlands and Batemans Bay, air conditioning at the club’s home base at the Berry Masonic Centre and purchase of general  storage and  modern office equipment which went to streamlining the playing conditions for members. Audrey was a few months shy of being a continuous member for 18 years.

Audrey will be greatly missed by all members of Berry Bridge club and the bridge community of the Shoalhaven, she and her husband have moved interstate to be closer to family.

We owe a great debt of thanks to Audrey and wish her and her husband all the best in their new life.

Marea Allen - Media

 

 

 

 
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Welcome to the Berry Bridge Club

The Berry Bridge Club cordially invites members and visitors to play Bridge in a relaxed and friendly environment. 

We play duplicate bridge on Saturday afternoons in the Berry Masonic Village Community Hall.

If you need a partner please contact me on 4464 2742. 

Lee Ann Roberts - President

 

REMINDER: Christmas Party starts at noon. And for catering purposes if you have not put your name down as attending please contact Lee Ann. 

CHRISTMAS PARTY:  The 2017 Christmas party will held on Saturday December 16 and all members and visitors are cordially invited. There will be an attendance list on display at the club so please record your name as early as possible to assist with catering. 

Results
9th December 2017
Sat 09 Dec 17
2nd December 2017
Sat 2 12 17
25th November 2017
Sat 25 11 17a
Need a partner?

Players requiring a Bridge partner please contact Lee Ann Roberts - 4464 2742

Kath's Bridge Tips

Thinking Outside of the Square

Many players and defenders take their tricks quickly then have little idea as to what to do next.

Because of the huge combinations of 52 cards, approximately 2.2 billion, dealt 13 cards to each player, Bridge is not a simple trick taking game.  Consequently, as most of us have noticed, it guides us to think outside of the square, forcing us to use our logic as we fumble around in the dark.   Hence, simple rules assist us to keep on the correct path.

The thought of giving tricks away to declarer goes against the card player’s grain. Examples of this include opening up new suits, ie playing a suit which has not been touched, or even leading away from an unsupported King, hoping partner has the Ace.  However, we must consider this: declarer has a contract to make and they’re going to make some or all of the contracted tricks, therefore, when you don’t want to give too much of your hand away, and you think you can defeat the contract, give declarer a trick in the form of a harmless trump which you’re certainly not going to make, or some other known or exposed dummy honour card.  This puts declarer in the position of doing the work of finding their way through the woods instead of you doing the job for them.  

We must always be aware that there are exceptions to every rule, sometimes this is deeply hidden and occasionally declarer gets away with making an unmakeable contract.  We can lessen this by carefully choosing our opening leads and our defence play by getting a reasonable picture of declarer’s hand on the bidding.  Example contract: 2H by West and dummy holds:

S Q106

H 865

D J75

C QJ104

Lead AD followed by the K and Q, ruffed by declareri

Declarer now plays the AK Clubs then switches to the QH won by North’s KH.  North now thinks: Declarer has SHOWN 5 hearts 2 clubs 2 diamonds and nothing about spades.  If they held a 4 card spade suit, surely they wouldhave attempted to set up the QS as an entry to the clubs.  This hasn’t happened, therefore, thinking outside the square, they may well hold 3 spades and 3 clubs, 5 hearts and 2 diamonds.If this is the case, South has no clubs left and a small club back will be trumped.  N/S made 6 tricks and a top board.

West held:

S AJ3

H QJ1097

D 108

C AK2

This hand was opportunistic for the defenders because if declarer had begun drawing trumps after the diamond ruff it would have been difficult for the defence to get the picture. 8 tricks are there, North held the singleton KH, south held HA432.

 

 

NSW Bridge Association

Please click on the above heading to hot link directly onto the NSW Bridge Association web page where you will find information about NSW Congress dates and locations and much more!

Results
9th December 2017
Sat 09 Dec 17
2nd December 2017
Sat 2 12 17
25th November 2017
Sat 25 11 17a
Need a partner?

Players requiring a Bridge partner please contact Lee Ann Roberts - 4464 2742

Kath's Bridge Tips

Thinking Outside of the Square

Many players and defenders take their tricks quickly then have little idea as to what to do next.

Because of the huge combinations of 52 cards, approximately 2.2 billion, dealt 13 cards to each player, Bridge is not a simple trick taking game.  Consequently, as most of us have noticed, it guides us to think outside of the square, forcing us to use our logic as we fumble around in the dark.   Hence, simple rules assist us to keep on the correct path.

The thought of giving tricks away to declarer goes against the card player’s grain. Examples of this include opening up new suits, ie playing a suit which has not been touched, or even leading away from an unsupported King, hoping partner has the Ace.  However, we must consider this: declarer has a contract to make and they’re going to make some or all of the contracted tricks, therefore, when you don’t want to give too much of your hand away, and you think you can defeat the contract, give declarer a trick in the form of a harmless trump which you’re certainly not going to make, or some other known or exposed dummy honour card.  This puts declarer in the position of doing the work of finding their way through the woods instead of you doing the job for them.  

We must always be aware that there are exceptions to every rule, sometimes this is deeply hidden and occasionally declarer gets away with making an unmakeable contract.  We can lessen this by carefully choosing our opening leads and our defence play by getting a reasonable picture of declarer’s hand on the bidding.  Example contract: 2H by West and dummy holds:

S Q106

H 865

D J75

C QJ104

Lead AD followed by the K and Q, ruffed by declareri

Declarer now plays the AK Clubs then switches to the QH won by North’s KH.  North now thinks: Declarer has SHOWN 5 hearts 2 clubs 2 diamonds and nothing about spades.  If they held a 4 card spade suit, surely they wouldhave attempted to set up the QS as an entry to the clubs.  This hasn’t happened, therefore, thinking outside the square, they may well hold 3 spades and 3 clubs, 5 hearts and 2 diamonds.If this is the case, South has no clubs left and a small club back will be trumped.  N/S made 6 tricks and a top board.

West held:

S AJ3

H QJ1097

D 108

C AK2

This hand was opportunistic for the defenders because if declarer had begun drawing trumps after the diamond ruff it would have been difficult for the defence to get the picture. 8 tricks are there, North held the singleton KH, south held HA432.

 

 

NSW Bridge Association

Please click on the above heading to hot link directly onto the NSW Bridge Association web page where you will find information about NSW Congress dates and locations and much more!