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Welcome back to Canada to all the Snow Birds from Florida and California!  From all reports it was a successful migration this year. lol

 
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Welcome to Barrie Bridge
Summer BBQ

This year's summer BBQ is being held on Wednesday evening July 12th starting at 5:00 pm.  Cost is $20 which includes your game of bridge starting at 7:00 pm.  Come hungry, you will not be disappointed! 

5 Year Annual Constitutional Review

The executive is forming a committee to review and update the club's constitution.  We are looking for club member volunteers that are not part of the executive to be on this committee.  If you are interested in being part of this effort please contact Marc Brenner.

ICON for City of Barrie

The Spirit Catcher on Barrie's Waterfront 

 

ICON for City of Barrie
A BRIDGE TOO FAR?

A RECENT STORY FROM BRIDGE IN THAILAND

A Bridge player at a recent competition at Polo Club in Bangkok. There are about 40 Bridge competitions each year in Thailand. The game of bridge has made unlikely headlines.

Ten days ago policemen and soldiers as well as local government officials in Pattaya raided a Jomtien & Pattaya Bridge Club get-together, arresting 32 foreign bridge players on gambling charges. Police reported finding a computer and score sheets at the scene, but no money, leading them to suspect that the players were transferring money online. The foreigners were held for over 12 hours, and were only released on 5,000 Baht bail each when the president of the Contract Bridge League of Thailand, Chodchoy Sophonpanich, personally visited Pattaya police to verify that bridge is, in fact, an internationally-recognised sport, and is even protected under Thai law.

Despite the interventions, the local authorities still insisted on laying charges on the foreigners for violating the 1943 Playing Cards Act which prohibits the possession of over 120 playing cards not produced by the Excise Department. Perhaps unknown to the officer, bridge is considered a complex tactical game, and not a simple gambling device, played ardently by people around the world as a recreational activity, as well as more seriously. In Thailand, there are regular bridge tournaments joined by hundreds of players. “Bridge was actually first introduced to Thailand by King Rama VI,” said Jaturong Sasibuth, an instructor from the Contract Bridge Club of Thailand.

According to Jaturong, the then-crown prince, Mongkut had learned the game during his days studying abroad in Britain. Impressed by the depth of strategy and logic involved, he introduced the game to his friends as well as the aristocrats of 1900s Thailand. Later, the game’s popularity spread to the nation’s newly established universities. “In truth, bridge’s existence in Thailand predates many popular spectator sports like football or basketball. Universities were offering scholarships for skilled bridge players even before Thai people knew about football,” said Jaturong. The Contract Bridge Club of Thailand is an official organisation in charge of holding up to 10 official bridge competitions a year, and has been in existence since the 1940s. Today, the club is also responsible for supervising independently-organised competitions from various partnered organisations, with nearly 40 competitions held each year in Thailand (including the club’s own events). “Legally speaking, public bridge competitions need to be sanctioned by the club first, like the one in Pattaya, which has been a member of the club for over a decade.

It’s not illegal to play bridge in the confines of your own home, however,” he said. Bridge is generally played with two or four players, with players sitting opposite from each other belonging to the same team. The game is divided into two different phases: the bidding and play phases, and is completed in 13 rounds. The bidding phase — to be overtly simplistic — involves each player taking turns bidding on a “contract”, which determines how many rounds of the play phase a player must win out of 13 in order to win points. Once a contract is established, the game proceeds to the play stage, which involves each player playing one card from their hand that corresponds to the suit played by the first player. The ultimate winner of each match is decided when the 13 rounds are over. Unlike popular household card games like slave or poker, bridge is classified more as a board game than a card game, as there are many other peripheral items required to play the game, such as bidding cards and score calculators. The bidding cards in particular are an essential part of the game, as they don’t only function as indicators of the victory conditions, but also as tools of communication, bluffing and strategy.

“All advanced bridge players adhere to a certain system of bidding or ‘language’, in order to communicate information with their teammates on the table, with different bidding cards meaning different things,” said Jaturong. “This is where the elements of logic and strategy come in. Players can use these cards as a question, request or — if they happen to know their opponents’ ‘language’ — even as tools for bluffing their opponents into making the wrong move. In serious competitive games, the players will even be separated from their teammates by a shutter, thus leaving the bidding cards as the only means of devising plans or strategies.” If all this sounds impossibly complicated to you, you’re not alone. According to Jaturong, teaching someone the intricacies of bridge usually takes months at least, and even then, it can take years for someone to truly grasp all the different bidding languages, most of which are still being continually refined today. In fact, the depth of strategy and logical thinking required to become a decent bridge player has qualified the game to even be taught as a fulltime course in many universities. “Chulalongkorn University offers an elective bridge class for our students,” said Asst Prof Dr Patarasinee Patarakosol, a mathematics professor from Chulalongkorn University’s faculty of science. The university most recently won two gold medals. “Even after five months of full-length courses, however, very few students can actually be considered good bridge players. Bridge requires a depth of strategic and logical thinking that is quite advanced, and only the best and brightest students are ever chosen to be bridge players. If you look at the most prominent bridge players in the world, almost all of them have professional backgrounds in engineering, medicine or science,” she said.

According to Dr Patarasinee, who also acts as the adviser for the university’s bridge and board games club, high-level bridge players tend to start learning the game at a very young age — as young as seven or eight. The difficulty of the game, however, means that even the youth level competitions of the sport rarely ever feature players under 25 years of age. “At its core, bridge is a game about probability and communication. Players use the rules of statistics to try to guess which cards their opponents hold, all the while using the bidding cards to communicate and devise plans and bluffs with their teammate,” she said. “It is a game that requires a depth of understanding rarely seen in other games, and is an excellent exercise in logical thinking.”

TRICKS AND POINTS

 

How Many Points for a NT Game?

My partner and I were discussing why I was not making my recent contracts in No Trump.  It couldn't be my play of the hand (LOL).  So I checked on-line and found this informative article on when the hand should make in NT.

Source:www.bridgebears.com  Ralph Welton on December 24, 2010

in Bridge Bidding Theory

How many points does it take to make a game contract in no trump – 3NT?

That depends on how you count points. Let’s start by looking at high card points only, with the common 4-3-2-1 point valuations. There are 40 points in the deck and thirteen tricks to every hand. So, on average, it takes 3 points to win a trick.

Based on this, one would expect 11 tricks from 33 points, leaving two tricks for the opponentsʼ 7 points. But a general guideline for slam bidding says that 12 tricks, and not 11, can be won with 33 points.

Similarly, to win nine tricks (3NT), one would predict 9 x 3 = 27 points, leaving four tricks for the opponentsʼ 13 points. 27 is indeed the old-fashioned guideline, but itʼs long outdated. Today, many believe a good 24 gives adequate play for 3N, leaving the opponents with only 4 tricks for their 16 points.

Precision uses 8 points as a minimum game force facing a big club of 16 (16 + 8 = 24). Some precision players allow the bidding to die at 2N when both opener and responder have lackluster balanced minimums, though they are quick to upgrade their hands and continue to 3N if the hand has additional value. A five card suit or a suit KT9x might be judged enough additional value to bid 3N on 24 hcp.

Here is a table comparing tricks won as declarer to total hcp in the partnership.

high card points

15

18

21

24

27

30

33

3 points per trick equals…

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

tricks actually won

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

The “tricks actually won” shown in this table will not be won on each and every hand. Thirty-three point slams frequently do go set, as do 24 point 3N contracts. But on average, the point totals given provide good play for the number of tricks listed as “tricks actually won”.

So, why is it that most players use a target of 25 or 26 points for bidding game? The answer takes us back to my original statement — it depends on how you count points. There are schemes for adding points for long suits, for short suits, and for fits — leading to point totals greater than the raw-hcp total. If you use one of these methods, then you will indeed want to have more than 24 total points for 3N.

The main trouble with this add-extra-points method is that it’s not the same for NT as it is for suits. Some theorists have devised separate methods for fit bidding and NT bidding. That’s OK if you can accurately judge when to use your NT method and when to use your suit method. For example, you’re thinking of raising partner’s diamond suit. Should you use your suit-oriented evaluation method, promoting for ruffing values and again for extra trumps, or your NT evaluation method, counting only hcp? Are you psychic enough to know when partner might be considering 3N? If not, you have to guess which method to use.

To avoid this problem, I suggest always using the NT method (hcp without distributional promotion) at least when 3N is possible final contract.

Computer simulations suggest a 24 point 3N contract is only about 50-50 to go plus. But is there a way to predict when the 24 pointers rate to succeed and when they rate to fail? It would be nice to only bid the ones that have good play for 9 tricks.

It turns out that the answer is yes. If you deduct a point for 4333 shape, and deduct a point for honors without small cards in the suit (unless partner has bid the suit), and if partner does the same, you will devalue exactly the hands that rate to play poorly in 3N.

Bidders often resist devaluing their hands, not wishing to pass when they might have bid, but discipline yourself in your counting, then bid aggressively to 24 point games. Here’s an example:

♠ K J
♥ A T 8 6
♦ Q J 7
♣ A J 9 2
This hand is worth 16 hcp minus one for the devalued spade KJ (subtract a point for honors with no small cards in the suit). If you open a standard 15-17 1N, and partner invites with 2N, you should decline.

♠ K J 6
♥ A T 8
♦ Q J 7
♣ A J 9 2
Move one of your small hearts into the spade suit, and the KJ pull full weight. But then you have 4333 shape, which is also a deduction, so you still decline.

♠ K J 8 6
♥ A T
♦ Q J 7
♣ A J 9 2
Move both of your small hearts into the spade suit, and you have no deductions. So you can accept, expecting to be in a 24 point game that is better than 50-50.

In addition to deducting for honors without a small card in the suit and deducting for 4333 shape, you should also deduct for holding 4 cards in a minor suit that partner has shown (see my post about what a fit is worth ). It may seem perverse to deduct for a fit when you’ve always been told that having a fit is a good thing, but that’s only true when evaluating your hand for play in the trump suit.

 

Click for the Members Only section
Results
Tue 27th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Paul Campbell
Mon 26th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: John LaMarre
Wed 21st Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Jane Foster
Tue 20th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: S. Brackern
Mon 19th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Dale MacKenzie
Wed 14th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Leigh Ives
Tue 13th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Paul Campbell
Mon 12th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Dale MacKenzie
Wed 7th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: John LaMarre
Tue 6th Jun 2017
Swiss Team Club Championship
Director: Dale MacKenzie
Calendar
Wed 28th Jun 2017
99er pairs
7pm
Director: Maggie
Wed 28th Jun 2017
open pairs
7pm
Mon 3rd Jul 2017
299er pairs
1pm
Mon 3rd Jul 2017
open pairs
1pm
Tue 4th Jul 2017
open pairs
1pm
Wed 5th Jul 2017
49er pairs Club Championship
7pm
Director: Maggie
Wed 5th Jul 2017
open pairs Club Championship
7pm
Mon 10th Jul 2017
299er pairs
1pm
Mon 10th Jul 2017
open pairs
1pm
Tue 11th Jul 2017
Swiss Teams
1pm
70+% Game

Contratulations to the McFarlane's (Paul and Margaret) for an amazing 76.5% game Wednesday evening April the 5th.  Highest score this year!  Beat that anyone.

Guaranteed Partner Program

The title says it all!  No partner, no problem.  There will be a partner guaranteed for you at every seession offered. NEW

New Life Masters

Congratualtions to Susan Bracken and Jan Gilewicz for achieving their Sliver Life Masters and to Christine Blake for achieving her Bronze Life Masters.  Also to Evelyn Caroline, Hugh Cleland, Judy DesRoches and Ruth Eidt for achieving their Life Masters. Well done all!

Welcome from Barrie Bridge Association

The Barrie Bridge Association (BBA) would like to extend a warm welcome to all local and visiting duplicate bridge players to the Barrie area.  We meet at Central United Church in Barrie, Ontario, at 54 Ross Street, L4N-1G3, at the corner of Ross and Toronto streets. Google Map We have games every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and occaisonal Sundays.   

The BBA is an ACBL-sanctioned club that offers duplicate bridge games for a variety of skill levels, and a beginner game with a lesson each week.  Please see the Calendar for upcoming scheduled games.

Please come out for an enjoyable afternoon or evening of bridge, and bring a friend!  Weather Gas Prices

Click for the Members Only section
Results
Tue 27th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Paul Campbell
Mon 26th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: John LaMarre
Wed 21st Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Jane Foster
Tue 20th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: S. Brackern
Mon 19th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Dale MacKenzie
Wed 14th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Leigh Ives
Tue 13th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Paul Campbell
Mon 12th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: Dale MacKenzie
Wed 7th Jun 2017
open pairs
Director: John LaMarre
Tue 6th Jun 2017
Swiss Team Club Championship
Director: Dale MacKenzie
Calendar
Wed 28th Jun 2017
99er pairs
7pm
Director: Maggie
Wed 28th Jun 2017
open pairs
7pm
Mon 3rd Jul 2017
299er pairs
1pm
Mon 3rd Jul 2017
open pairs
1pm
Tue 4th Jul 2017
open pairs
1pm
Wed 5th Jul 2017
49er pairs Club Championship
7pm
Director: Maggie
Wed 5th Jul 2017
open pairs Club Championship
7pm
Mon 10th Jul 2017
299er pairs
1pm
Mon 10th Jul 2017
open pairs
1pm
Tue 11th Jul 2017
Swiss Teams
1pm
70+% Game

Contratulations to the McFarlane's (Paul and Margaret) for an amazing 76.5% game Wednesday evening April the 5th.  Highest score this year!  Beat that anyone.

Guaranteed Partner Program

The title says it all!  No partner, no problem.  There will be a partner guaranteed for you at every seession offered. NEW

New Life Masters

Congratualtions to Susan Bracken and Jan Gilewicz for achieving their Sliver Life Masters and to Christine Blake for achieving her Bronze Life Masters.  Also to Evelyn Caroline, Hugh Cleland, Judy DesRoches and Ruth Eidt for achieving their Life Masters. Well done all!

Welcome from Barrie Bridge Association

The Barrie Bridge Association (BBA) would like to extend a warm welcome to all local and visiting duplicate bridge players to the Barrie area.  We meet at Central United Church in Barrie, Ontario, at 54 Ross Street, L4N-1G3, at the corner of Ross and Toronto streets. Google Map We have games every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and occaisonal Sundays.   

The BBA is an ACBL-sanctioned club that offers duplicate bridge games for a variety of skill levels, and a beginner game with a lesson each week.  Please see the Calendar for upcoming scheduled games.

Please come out for an enjoyable afternoon or evening of bridge, and bring a friend!  Weather Gas Prices