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Any member who requires a partner can use 'Whats app'.  There is an help sheet in the left hand side menu to read first.  For more helpcontact paul Merrick -   07979 862896 or email  p@merrick.name

Lead out of turn

Opening Lead out of Turn

The first two options involve accepting the opening lead, and they are:

  1. Dummy goes down now and then the lead comes round to the dummy.
  2. You can become the dummy and let your partner become declarer.
    If you do not accept the opening lead out of turn, the lead reverts to your left-hand opponent.
  3. You may let him play what he wishes, the offending card staying on the table as a major penalty card to be played at the first legal opportunity.
    The final two options involve the offending card being restored to your right-hand opponent’s hand and they are:
  4. You may demand that left-hand opponent lead a spade.
  5. You may forbid a spade lead from left-hand opponent for so long as he retains the lead. In other words, he must lose the lead and then regain it before he may lead spades.
    If declarer chooses to demand or forbid a spade lead then when you (the offender’s partner) regain the lead, you must have a sound bridge reason for now switching to a spade.

Lead out of Turn During Play by the Defenders

You may accept the lead without taking advantage of any other options, but you should be aware of the alternatives before you do.  If you accept, play continues as though there was no irregularity.

  1. If you do not accept the opening lead out of turn, the lead reverts to your left-hand opponent.
  2. You may let him play what he wishes, the offending card staying on the table as a major penalty card to be played at the first legal opportunity.
    The final two options involve the offending card being restored to your right-hand opponent’s hand and they are:
  3. You may demand that left-hand opponent lead a spade. The offending card is picked up.
  4. You may forbid a spade lead from left-hand opponent for so long as he retains the lead.  In other words, he must lose the lead and then regain it before he may lead spades.  The offending card is picked up. 
    If declarer chooses to demand or forbid a spade lead then when you (the offender’s partner) regain the lead, you must have a sound bridge reason for now switching to a spade.

Lead out of Turn by Decalarer